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John Weston and John Barwise (1820 - 1842)
Gold and enamel diamond-set watch

Case - inside: punched with a charge mark (two branches crossed) used 1756 - 1762
Case - inside: punched with a crowned letter Y
Case - inside: punched with the casemaker's mark J Q with a star above
Case - inside: punched with the Paris ma, 1762 (case), c. 1842-3 (movement)

case; gold, enamel, diamond, hardstone

case 44.9 mm diameter case 19.2 mm thickness movement 33.6 mm diameter pillar 4.5 mm height

Case: A two-colour gold case with floral swags over a matted ground on the bezel and band. The bezel is also set with brilliants around the rim. The back of the case has a cartouche surrounded by a circle of brilliants and graded husks of red gold enclosing an octofoil panel enamelled en plein showing a musical party (a piano trio) said to be after Jean-Baptiste van Loo. The pendant and bow are also set with brilliants. Two holes in the bezel suggests that the watch was a dumb repeater with a pulse piece. On the inside the case is punched with a crowned letter Y, the Paris mark for 1762, a charge mark (two branches crossed) used 1756 - 1762 and the casemaker's mark J Q with a star above. The bezel is hinged to the case at the side, the movement at XII. Dial: A gilt-brass dial plate finely engraved around the edge with foliate scrolls over a matted ground. White enamel dial with an outer circle for the minutes numbered 5-60 and hours I-XII around an inner circle. A winding hole between II and III. Silver hands set with brilliants. Movement: Gilt-brass plates with four turned pillars. Gilt-brass barrel with ratchet set-up beneath the dial. Fusee with chain, standard stop-work and Harrison's maintaining power. Four wheel train of gilt-brass wheels, the centre wheel solid, the third and fourth wheels with five crossings. Ratchet-tooth lever escapement with jewelled pallets and impulse pin. Polished steel three-arm balance, spiral balance spring regulated by an index mounted on the balance cock. The movement is signed: Barwise London No 11 432 The casemaker's mark is so far unidentified. The movement comes from the workshops of Weston and John Barwise who were in partnership between 1820 and 1842. Notes: 1. The case and dial plate of this watch are French while the movement and dial are clearly later in date and are English in origin. The design of the pendant, the lack of piercing in the case and the fact there was originally a pulse piece in the case show that it was a dumb repeater. The conversion has been professionally done and may even have taken place in Barwise's workshops. 2. From the evidence provided by other surviving Barwise watches, the number 11/432 would have been made in about 1842-1843 see David Thompson, 'The Watches of Barwise of London' Antiquarian Horology Vol. XXIV (Autumn 1998) pp.240-243).

Christie's
Mrs Ben Nathan

Bequeathed by J. Francis Mallett, 1947.

WA1947.191.111

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