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24 July 2014 – 2 November 2014
Tickets

Exhibitions: Discovering Tutankhamun: Events

Introductory Tours

Introductory Exhibition talks: Tuesdays and Thursdays 3.30–4.15pm

Tours are free with price of admission and no booking is necessary.

Please meet in the Exhibition Shop on the Third Floor.

Family Fun

All family events are free, with a suggested donation of £1 per child. Children must be accompanied by an adult to all events

Big Draw: Along the River Nile
Saturday 11 October, 1–4pm, Education Centre

Help us bring the Ancient Egyptian landscape to life in collage, and find a home for Egyptian treasures.

Follow this link to find out more about a family visit to the museum, and see all of our family events.

Free family Tutankhamun trails and activity sheets are available in the exhibition. Pick up on the door or follow this link to download from our website. Entry to the exhibition is free for under-12s.

LiveFriday

LiveFriday
Egyptomania!
Friday 31 October, 7-10pm

Enjoy Egyptian dancing, family craft activities and Tut-tastic musical performances throughout the Museum in this special LiveFriday extravaganza. The event will also feature a programme of talks, tours and lectures looking at life and death in ancient Egypt, pharaohs and mummies, and the fashion crazed Egyptomania of the 1920s. To find out more follow this link.

Special Evening Events

Fit for a Pharaoh: the Authorised Facsimile of Tutankhamun's tomb
With Adam Lowe, Director and Founder of Factum Arte
Wednesday 29 October, 6.30–7.30pm

Before Egypt’s recent political revolution, the tomb of Tutankhamun was viewed by about 1,000 visitors per day. This had a dramatic effect on the temperature, humidity and dust levels in the small space, which resulted in a deterioration of the structure of the walls. Using the latest digital technology to record the tomb’s interior in unparalleled detail, Factum Arte have produced a full-scale facsimile that can be visited at Luxor, thus relieving pressure on the actual tomb. Adam Lowe explains the process behind the production of the facsimile and explores current debates about the creation of replicas to preserve the world’s cultural heritage for future generations. To book please telephone the Box Office on 01865 305 305, or follow this link to book online.

Workshops

Eye of Horus Necklace Workshop
With London-based jewellery design company Tatty Devine
Saturday 18 October, 12–1.30pm & 2–3.30pm, Education Centre

Influenced by the 'Discovering Tutankhamun' exhibition, join esteemed independent design company Tatty Devine and make your own 'Eye of Horus' necklace at this exclusive jewellery making workshop. Learn the essential techniques and skills needed to create a necklace in gold and sapphire mirror Perspex. Create your perfect statement piece or a one-of-a-kind gift that's fit for a Pharaoh. Tickets £45/£40 concessions. Booking is essential. To book please telephone the Box Office on 01865 305 305, or follow this link to book online.

Daytime Lectures

Booking is recommended for all lectures as places are limited. To book please telephone the Box Office on 01865 305 305, or follow this link to book online.

The Elegant Explorer: Fortnum & Mason and the English Epicure in Egypt
With Dr Andrea Tanner, Fortnum & Mason archivist
Wednesday 1 October, 2.30–3.30pm, Lecture Theatre

When Fortnum & Mason supplied provisions for the Earl of Carnarvon's Egyptian archaeological expeditions in the 1920s, the firm already had a long tradition of sending a taste of home to English men and women abroad. Join Fortnum and Mason's resident archivist, Dr Andrea Tanner, to discover the company's history of feeding explorers and adventurers from the heart of Piccadilly, from the 18th century until the present day. Entry to this lecture is free for all and no booking is required. Places are limited so please arrive early to guarantee your seat.

Egyptomania: The Allure of Ancient Egypt
With Henrietta McCall, Department of the Middle East, British Museum
Saturday 11 October, 2–3pm, Lecture Theatre

Henrietta McCall talks about the enduring appeal of ancient Egypt in western culture. She assesses how it began with Napoleon in the early 19th century; how symbols and imagery from antiquity inspired architecture, gardens, furniture and fashion; and how in the 1920s that appeal reached its climax with the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun. Tickets £5/£4 concessions. Booking is recommended as places are limited.

"Everywhere the Glint of Gold" Colourising Tutankhamun's Tomb
With Liam McNamara, Keeper for Ancient Egypt and Sudan and co-curator of 'Discovering Tutankhamun'
Saturday 18 October, 2–3pm, Lecture Theatre

Howard Carter's evocative description of the 'wonderful things' he saw upon entering Tutankhamun's tomb continues to capture the public's imagination. The excavation of the tomb and its contents were documented in black and white photographs taken by Harry Burton. This talk explores the various methods by which the excavators – and their successors – sought to 'colourise' the contents of the king's tomb, from 20th-century gouache paintings on ivory, to the latest in 21st-century digital imaging techniques. Tickets £5/£4 concessions. Booking is recommended as places are limited.

Tutankhamun and Revolution
With Dr Paul Collins, Jaleh Hearn Curator for Ancient Near East and co-curator of 'Discovering Tutankhamun'
Saturday 25 October, 2–3pm, Lecture Theatre

This talk considers three historical periods when the image and idea of Tutankhamun became a focus for revolution both in Egypt and beyond. Starting in the ancient world, the revolutions of the Amarna age, into which Tutankhamun was born, witnessed a transformation in the concept of kingship. In the early 20th century, as Egypt claimed independence from British control, Tutankhamun became a symbol of opposition to imperial rule. Finally, in recent years, Egypt has faced political upheaval and revolutionaries have again employed the image of Tutankhamun. Tickets £5/£4 concessions. Booking is recommended as places are limited.

Howard Carter: from Artist to Archaeologist
With Dr Jaromir Malek, President of the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East
Saturday 1 November, 2–3pm, Lecture Theatre

A talented artist in his early life, Howard Carter is mostly recognised as the archaeologist who discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun. However, he was far from an orthodox academic. This talk examines the life of a man who, despite strained relations with the British academic establishment, the Egyptian authorities and several of his colleagues, remained determined to complete the documentation of the tomb's contents against all odds. Tickets £5/£4 concessions. Booking is recommended as places are limited.

In conjunction with the University of Oxford's seminar series for Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies

Booking is recommended for all lectures as places are limited. To book please telephone the Box Office on 01865 305 305, or follow this link to book online. Free entry for University students with a valid ID.

'Tutankhamun and Co. Ltd': Arthur Weigall and the Discovery of Tutankhamun's Tomb
With Julie Hankey, author of 'A Passion for Egypt: Arthur Weigall, Tutankhamun and the Curse of the Pharaohs'
Tuesday 14 October, 2.30–3.30pm, Lecture Theatre

From 1905 to 1912, Arthur Weigall was Howard Carter's successor as Chief Inspector of Antiquities for Upper Egypt. He used his position to conduct a campaign against government practice of allowing amateur collectors to excavate for private profit. With Tutankhamun's discovery, Weigall came into open conflict with Carter's patron, Lord Carnarvon, over his exclusive contract with The Times, and – at a time of political unrest in Egypt – over his assumption of rights to the contents of the tomb. Tickets £4/£3 concessions. Booking is recommended as places are limited.

Tutankhaten – Prince and King
With Dr Marianne Eaton-Krauss, independent scholar
Tuesday 21 October, 2.30–3.30pm, Lecture Theatre

The name of Tutankhamun is familiar throughout the world, yet academics continue to dispute not only the identity of the boy king's parents, but also the meaning of the name he was given at birth, Tutankhaten. This lecture explores these questions and examines objects that document his life up until the moment the decision was taken to alter his name to Tutankhamun, marking the conclusion of a campaign to restore the god Amun to his traditional place at the head of the pantheon from which he had been toppled by the heretic pharaoh Akhenaten. Tickets £4/£3 concessions. Booking is recommended as places are limited.

Unwrapping Tutankhamun
With Dr Christina Riggs, Senior Lecturer, School of Art History and World Art Studies, University of East Anglia
Tuesday 28 October, 2.30–3.30pm, Lecture Theatre

After three years of work in the tomb, Howard Carter and his team were ready to reveal the body of Tutankhamun. Using photographs and diaries from the excavation, this illustrated lecture follows Carter's work in stages as they worked through the layers of wrappings around Tutankhamun's body, and considers what else we can learn from the unwrapping of other materials in the tomb. Tickets &£4/£3 concessions. Booking is recommended as places are limited.